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Kent County Cuisine--As Fresh As It Gets (travel article)

The benefits of eating locally sourced food are well lauded, from increased flavor and freshness to reduced waste, transit pollution and fuel consumption. Islanders naturally realize these advantages as their geographical limitations demand resourcefulness of everything the environment offers.
While Kent County, Maryland isn’t technically an island, it is nearly surrounded by water. Native tribes and early settlers thrived on its bounties from the sea and its fruitful soil. Fortunately, their traditions of self-reliance continue to prosper with residents today. Fare with Fresh Air Dining al fresco brings you closer to food’s origins, and when the weather in Kent County warms the tables are set for outdoor dining. The wraparound deck overlooking the Chester River isn’t the only thing elevated at 98 Cannon Riverfront Grille. Chef Golder takes his casual cuisine menu quite seriously with local daily catch, farm-to-table favorites, handmade brick-oven pizzas, craft beers and brunch. And…
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A Bird’s-Eye View of Kent County (travel article)

A patchwork of green, yellow and brown cover a landscape surrounded by large swaths of silvery blue glinting like a mirror for the sun; ribbons of jade and teal weave through clusters of lush green groves; and quaint towns where life is slow and easy offer fountains and flower gardens by which to rest… it’s Kent County, Maryland from a bird’s-eye view. With a landscape this inviting, it’s no wonder that the area is a haven for birds, waterfowl and butterflies.
From wooded to wetland, agricultural to pelagic, Kent County’s variety of ecosystems offer both migratory and resident birds prime habitats for respite or long-term stays, and those year-round accommodations means it’s a major destination for birding enthusiasts, too.
As of spring 2019, the Maryland Ornithological Societylisted 453 species of birds in Maryland (315 in Kent County alone) with another 20 listed as subspecies or species of questionable or exotic origin. That’s nearly half of the 1100-or-so species reported to exist …

In Sedona, Art Surrounds You (travel writing)

There’s no better way to sample the ethos of a destination than to take a contemplative tour through its art scene. When you do so in Sedona, Arizona, pack comfortable walking shoes—hiking boots, too—because there’s miles and miles to roam, some of which are off-road. With 80-plus art galleries, art-inspired festivals and events happening year-round, and heritage sites that exhibit the ancient art of the area’s earliest inhabitants, it’s clearer than the sparkling streams of Oak Creek—Sedona inspires creativity.
It makes sense that Sedona’s roots came from ranching since Oak Creek and the nearby Verde River provided early settlers with abundant irrigation, but the pioneers were drawn to this rugged place for more than its perennial water source. Beyond its verdant valleys, rubiginous rock faces and formations stimulated the imaginations of these providential people and, just as cloud formations might, yielded picturesque names like Chimney Rock, Coffee Pot Rock, Cathedral Rock and Devi…

A College Town Where History, Humanities and the Arts Are for Everyone (travel article)

Chestertown, located in Kent County, Maryland, thrives with historical significance, lively festivals, a vibrant art and cultural scene,eclectic shops, charming inns and diverse restaurants. It’s also home to Washington College, the 10th oldest liberal arts college in the country (whose name was gifted to the institution by George Washington himself). Since its founding in 1782, the college’s influences have continued to flow through Chestertown like the waterways that surround it. Historic Attractions You don’t have to be a history major to appreciate this tri-centennial town. With Maryland’s second largest district of restored 18th century homes, history buffs will want to book a guided walking tour at the Bordley History Center, headquarters of the Historical Society of Kent County. From historic homes to sites that our founding fathers visited, you’ll learn the lore that lives there—the walls may not talk, but the docents do. During the Ghost Walks, however, maybe the walls are tal…

The 7 Best Places to Picnic in Sedona (travel article)

Sunny days, blue skies and green grassy lawns begging to be lounged on are the palette for the quintessential summer picnic—add in the red rock vistas of Sedona and you’ve got a masterpiece in the making. Here are seven of Sedona’s best places to nosh in nature—from enclaves along rugged trails, lands preserved for historical and natural edification to traditional manicured public parks—they’re all so jaw-droppingly good, you might have to remind yourself to chew.
Leave your coffee pot behind when you breakfast on Brins Mesa Trail, but bring plenty of water. Conveniently located on the edge of town, with good parking at the end of Park Ridge Drive, this six-mile out and back trek trades the shade for vast vistas—including Coffee Pot Rock, Wilson Mountain, Chimney Rock and more. Go early during summer months and brunch at the flat-rock ledge near the end of the trail while taking in the rewarding view and appreciating the effort you made to get there (though moderately rated, the trail …

Chasing the Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab (travel article)

Grab those little wooden mallets, because it’s time to chase down the delicate, sweet seafood flavor of the Chesapeake Bay blue crab, and in Kent County, Maryland the supply is plentiful, and the tradition of celebrating the season is lively.
Callinectes sapidus or “beautiful, savory swimmers” have shades of blue mainly on their legs and claws, and some specimens, though rare, are entirely blue. No matter the amount of blue, these crabs harvested from the Chesapeake Bay promise a sweet, delicate meat that’s neither briny nor mealy.
Blue crabs are smaller than Dungeness crabs, but when it comes to flavor, size doesn’t matter. Some of the sweetest meat comes from smaller crabs (more proof that good things come in small packages). You might work a bit more for those delicate morsels, but that’s part of the fun—an unhurried, communal meal that keeps us gathered at the table enjoying great food, good drink and memorable conversation.
Crack. Shuck. Savor.
The locals will tell you Chesapeake …